Susanne FraserImage Gallery

Contact Details

Studio: P O Box 279, Alstonville, New South Wales 2477, Australia, . View in Google Maps
Telephone: +61(0)438307378
Email:
Web-site: www.earthlyvisions.com.au
Availability: Visitors welcome, but please telephone first.
Joined on: 2011-02-03
Last Updated: 2014-08-04

Artist's Statement

Artist's Statement

I live on a rural property just outside the small town of Alstonville   NSW, Australia, here I have a studio practice and indulge in a rural life style.  My love and appreciation of the horse is derived from an association of over 50 years as owner trainer and competitor in equestrian disciplines.  I have been associated with horses since I was four when my neighbor gave me my first pony.   A consuming passion for making ceramic horses developed while studying Ceramics at TAFE then Visual Arts at Southern Cross University in early 2000.  

 In 2005 I traveled to China with a friend as an artist in residence at the Sanbao Institute in Jingdezhen.  Here I became familiar with traditional Chinese Ceramics as well as figurines and horses from the Tang Dynasty period which lined the spirit paths to the many tombs.  The Tang period was a time when well bred horses were symbols of power and status, they were central to empire building.  Horses were celebrated in art and poetry during this golden age of changes in education, the arts and culture.

Taking history as a starting point my equine vessels and sculptures have multi-surface decorations and expressions that suggest layers of social and political meaning.   Layered glazes, such a magnesium crawl glaze, Cobalt oxide and barium based slips, are applied with broad strokes to enhance texture.  The surface cracks and crazing convey the difficult journeys of the horse and riders spirit from the past to the present. My work also references feminine connections with horses through the relationship of the shape of vessels/forms and their decorative elements. 

I enjoy combining tne the complexity of meanings inherent in Chinese plant and animal life with equine themes.  My ceramic art develops ideas of the symbolic significance of the horse in society and its influence on cultures.  It is an ongoing exploration using the expressive and plastic qualities of clay to explore personal interpretations of the many aspects of the human horse relationship.

Technical Information

Technical Information

Small electric kiln for bisque and decals. Gas Kiln for bisque & glazing. Woodfire Kiln. Stoneware, Porcelain and Earthenware clays and paperclay. 1300 oxidation, reduction and 1100 oxidation. 

Availability

Availability

Haydon Hall Murrurundi www.haydonhall.com.au/
Bare Bones Art Space Bangalow: www.barebonesartspace.com.au
Art Aspects Gallery Lismore:  www.artaspectsgallery.com.au 

See the catalogue for Sue Fraser's show - The Dragon’s Back 

See some of Sue's current exhibition work here

Education and Residencies

Education and Residencies

Education
2008 - Bachelor Visual Arts – Southern Cross University Lismore
2003 - Diploma of Ceramics – TAFE Northern Rivers, Lismore
1986 - 1992 University of New England Armidale NSW, Units in Archeaology, History, Paleoanthropology and Aboriginal Studies.
1963 Intermediate Certificate Kyogle High School

Artist Residency
2005 - Sanbao Ceramic Art Institute, Jingdezhen, China: www.chinaclayart.com
2009 - Pottery Workshop Jingdezhen China & research trip to Xian & Xining: www.potteryworkshop.org/jingdezhen/residencyprogram/
2010 - International Ceramic Artist Exhibition & Workshop Gangjin, South Korea, (August 7-20)

Exhibitions

Exhibitions

Solo Exhibitions
2014 - Art & Equine Haydon Hall Murrurundi  1st May – 1st June
2014 - Craft NSW –invited ceramicist Art and the Horse   28th Jan – 16th Feb
2010 - Spirited Horses Grafton Regional Gallery 7th July – Sunday 29th August 2010
2009 - Spring Carnival, Northern Rivers Community Gallery Ballina
2008 - Spirit of Yangzhou’s Horses, Wattling Galleries Southport
2005 - Impressions - Sanbao Ceramic Art Institute, Jingdezhen, China

Selected Group Exhibitions
2014 - Proposed exhibition Pieces of Eight  Northern Rivers Community Gallery Ballina Aug-Sept 
2014 - Proposed - Saphire 45th Brisbane Grammar School Art Show – invitation only – 22nd & 23rd August


2014 - John Villers Waltzing Matilda Outback Art Show - 5th may – 11th July 
2014 - Feb 28 6th April  with Raglan at GAUGE 68 Glebe Pt Rd. Sydney
2013 - Amsterdam Art Fair with Retrospect Planet Byron Bay
2013 - Brussels & Milan Affordable Art Fair with Retrospect Planet Byron Bay
2013 - Table Manners – Group Show curated by Suvira McDonald - Northern Rivers Community Gallery Ballina Oct 2 – 27th

2012 - Stockholm Art Fair with Retrospect Planet Byron Bay Nov.
2012 - Table Manners – Group Show curated by Suvira McDonald Northern Rivers Community Gallery Ballina May 2nd – 27th
2012 - Dragons Back – Group Show, Tweed River Art Gallery, and 23rd March – 6th May tweed.nsw.gov.au/ArtGallery/ArtGalleryComingExhibitionsHome.aspx
2011 - Northern Style – Group Show -,Ceramics, Cudgegong Gallery, Gulgong, 2nd December 2011. – 30th January 2012
2011 - Artisans in the Garden, Lion Gate Lodge, Royal Botanical Gardens Sydney, 8th Oct – 16th Oct.

2010 - Border Art Prize Exhibition, Tweed River Art Gallery 3 December 2010 - 23 January 2011.
2010 - SOFA Chicago November 5-7.
2010 - Swallowing Clouds Northern Rivers Communities Gallery Ballina, September 4th – Oct 10th .
2010 - International Ceramic Artist Exhibition & Workshop Gangjin, South Korea August 7-20.
2009 - Post Cards Alumni Exhibition, Next Gallery SCU, Lismore
2008 - Guardians of Empress Wu, Art & Culture Exhibition, Byron Bay
FEHVA 48 hrs of Art Bangalow A&I Hall –
FEHVA 48 hrs of Art Bangalow A&I Hall –
Footprints – NEXT Art Gallery, Southern Cross University, Lismore
Stanthorpe Art Prize Exhibition - Stanthorpe Art Gallery, Stanthorpe

2007 - Transition Graduation Show Southern Cross University, Lismore
Diversity Dialogues: - The Alleyway Gallery –Lismore
2004 - Regional Treasures – ‘Pamela’ Lismore Regional Gallery, Lismore NSW
‘Bowl’d & Beautiful’ –‘3 Colours Ash’- Ceramic Art Gallery, Paddington
2003 - Thursday Plantation Sculpture Show - 'Tree of Life'

Collections and Residency

Collections and Residency

Collections
Grafton Regional Gallery

Gangjin Celadon Porcelain Festival Museum, South Korea
Byron Shire Council, Byron Bay NSW
Various private collections 

Articles

Articles

2010 - Ceramics Today, Jeffrey B. Snyder, Editor.  (ISBN: 9780764334658), p.66.
2009 - Ceramic Art & Perception, Vol. 76 pp. 76-77.  ‘Guardians of Empress Wu’ written by Louise Fulton: www.ceramicart.com.au/
2009 - Craft Arts International Vol. 76 Portfolio p.118: www.craftarts.com.au/aboutus.asp

Awards

Awards

2001 - Thursday Plantation Sculpture Show – Student Art Prize ‘Rosa a horse drama’ 
2003 - Coraki 3D Art Prize   Coraki NSW 
2011 - Artfelt Art Prize  Exhibition 7th Sept – 10th Oct.,  Ballina Community Art Gallery; 3rd Prize
2011 - Woollam Waltzing Matild Outback Art Show 2011 2nd May - 24th June 2011 Outback Regional Gallery Winton  QLD; 1st  3D Outback Art Prize
2012 - Waves & Waterways Exhibition & Sale; Packing Room Prize Ballina  NSW
2012 - Byron Arts Classic; Council Acquisitive Prize  Byron Bay  NSW

Sue Fraser - The Art of the Horse by Sharne Wolff

Sue Fraser - The Art of the Horse by Sharne Wolff

When challenged, artist Sue Fraser finds it hard to remember a time when she wasn’t altogether enamoured with horses. As a young girl, her mind imagined every new horizon as a place to explore at a gallop. Sue’s first horse, a good-natured, big-bellied pony named Daphne, was a fourth birthday gift. A fall from Daphne’s back in her youth resulted in a broken wrist but didn’t diminish Sue’s girlish passion. Ten years ago, however, a nasty accident finally forced this keen horsewoman to abandon competitive riding. After taking up University study, Sue successfully completed her Visual Arts Degree and simultaneously discovered an enthusiasm for the expressive qualities of clay. This combined with her innate fondness for horses has meant both interests now lie at the centre of her contemporary practice.

In recent years, ongoing experimentation with materials and a developing fascination with Chinese art history has been driven by Sue’s continuing exploration of the complex human-horse relationship. A particular focus is the familiar social and spiritual bond between women and horses. Although recognised in popular culture from the 1944 Oscar winning film National Velvet, to the My Little Pony toy franchise and Australian novelist Elyne Mitchell’s Silver Brumby series (a favourite of the artist), this affiliation has often been overlooked in academic research. Myths that equate the kinship between women and horses to a romantic ideal or a quest for female sexual dominance are plentiful. Sue, however, remains unconvinced that these theories provide all the answers. The desire for freedom expressed in the act of riding, alongside the contrasting qualities of fragility and strength possessed by both horses and women, are two themes found at the heart of her art.

Through her art Sue is intent on exploring the deep mysteries and ancient links in the relationship. Spurred on by a residency and subsequent workshop in Jingdezhen (China), a subject of her latest work has developed around research into Chinese art history. Dating back to the cultural freedoms of the Tang Dynasty in 7 – 10th century China, women have been portrayed in equine art and sculpture. Centuries before it became common in Western civilisation, women in China were illustrated riding astride their horses. Poses and facial expressions in the arts increasingly conveyed the strength and valour of individual personalities, both equine and human.

Drawing together all these threads, Sue’s horses enact gender issues through the adoption of concepts from traditional Chinese equine figures. Created in different sizes and a range of colours the stylised equine sculptures and vessels are often adorned with decorative elements – particularly plant and floral motifs borrowed from Chinese culture for their symbolic value. In earthy browns, intense oranges, and handsome blue/green shades, Sue experiments with luminous glazes all mixed by hand. Each artisan sculpture of clay may also be festooned with a floral mane, plaited tail or embellished with a cobalt blue and white blanket. The latter traditional blend of colours is said to have had its first Chinese use in Jingdezhen.

Layers of meaning and cultural connection are initiated by the artist’s choice of colour and decoration. Sue also continues the Chinese tradition of naming each horse according to its character and decoration. While reflecting the artist’s affection for each individual sculpture it also captures something of each personality.

Work Styles

Work Styles

Sculptural
Animals and Birds